Top garden design trends from the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show

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The Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show returns to the heritage-listed Carlton Gardens and Royal Exhibition Building from Wednesday 30 March to Sunday 3 April 2022.




Top garden design trends from the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show






The coveted festival will bring plant and flower lovers together with its bespoke floral and landscape designs, educational talks from industry elites, hands-on workshops and a catalog of the latest and greatest in gardening products.

To learn more about the show gardens featured, we spoke to three of the landscapers and asked them about the top 3 trends evident in their garden designs.

Christian Jenkins (Christian Jenkins Landscape Design)

After everyone’s time in lockdown, a huge resurgence in home entertainment is back. Christian therefore decided to include both an outdoor kitchen and a fireplace area, located between a large lagoon and an outdoor room.



Christian Jenkins


Christian Jenkins

Christian Jenkins

Christian’s top trends in “Inner Calm”:

  1. Wellness gardens: a space designed for the individual to reflect and a place where they can recharge their batteries and connect.
  2. Water Features: large lagoon-style features in the garden create that instant tranquility, reflection, movement and sound.
  3. Tropical inspired gardens: They work hand-in-hand with a wellness-inspired garden – the rich, bold foliage, tolerance to drought and wind, and suitability for Victoria’s climate. This garden style is not for everyone.

Ian Firth (Warner Nurseries)


Ian Firth

Ian Firth


Ian Firth

Ian Firth

Warners Nurseries has been associated with bringing gardening to Victorians since the first Melbourne Garden Week in 1925 and with every MIFGS since. This garden, ‘More than Meets the Eye’, highlights the diversity of planting suitable for Victorian gardens and shows the range of design possibilities available. It brings together the plants WR Warner was growing in 1914 as well as the latest “trends” in contemporary garden design.

Ian’s main tendencies in “More than meets the eye”:

  1. Ginkgo biloba ‘Piedmont Pillar: “The Living Fossil” is a species of tree native to China. It is the last living species of the order Ginkgoales, which first appeared more than 290 million years ago. It is also a beautiful deciduous tree with vibrant fall foliage.
  2. The Miles choice of Laurus Nobilis: “A berry for all seasons” – The berry hedge is one of the most versatile screening plants available. Hardy, drought and frost tolerant with dark green foliage. It forms the backbone of our garden.
  3. The edible garden: The symbol of sustainability. From the reclaimed materials used to construct the picket fence and wall to the very nature of the homegrown food, this section of our garden, “More Than It Seems”, reflects our sustainable ethos.

Inge Jabara (Inge Jabara Landscapes)


Inge Jabara (Inge Jabara Landscapes)

Engineer Jabara


Engineer Jabara

Engineer Jabara

The three key trends of “Granum Flore”:

  1. Corten steel (rusty steel) is back for garden elements. For a few years now, everything has revolved around black powder-coated steel. Now it’s back to the good old Corten steel hero.
  2. cobblestone pavers, but not just for a traditional look. In our garden this year we used Italian porphyry pavers from RMS Traders for a modern touch. These pavers have a wonderful natural color variation, like a natural river bed.
  3. Single block planting – through key selections, we only used about ten plant species to create a soft and simple look. Wheat-colored plants with soft textures were used. It’s about creating tranquility and low maintenance in the home. Also, a bigger factor about planting in single blocks is that they require less maintenance and chemicals because they mimic what the natural landscape already does.
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