Marcin Rusak uses flowers to crystallize deterioration at the Slovenian Design Biennial BIO27

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Marcin Rusak presents a solo exhibition at the bio27 design biennial

On the occasion of the 27th edition of the Slovenian Biennale of BIO design, Marcin Rusak presents the DNA of thingsa new exposure concept summarizing designer’s research-based creative pursuits. The show refers to Rusak’s Previous work where he explores genetic mutation applied to natural evolution, reusing flowers in multiple complex parts in resin or petrifying plant elements in metal. This juxtaposition of projects opens a new dialogue between man and the natural world – one that has the potential to overcome the constraints imposed on our materiality by the time factor.

Each of Rusak’s star collections: the Perishable vases, Protoplastic nature, nature of things – presents an attempt to crystallize deterioration, celebrate transformation and reduce an entire process to a smell or a material. In the exhibition, the stages of this ongoing research are presented as a living archive, a review of the studio’s attempts to convert biodegradable organic compounds into tangible materials. The exhibition was developed especially for the BIO27 satellite program and will be presented in Ljubljana from May 26 to October 10, 2022.

all images courtesy of Marcin Rusak Studio unless otherwise noted

to reflect on the ephemeral by highlighting the decline

Drawing inspiration from his father and grandfather who were both flower growers, Marcin Rusak creates unique works of art showcasing the mesmerizing beauty inherent in natural resources. Marcin Rusak collects, examines, crystallizes and destroys natural elements, giving them new life or transforming them into effigies of themselves.

In his work, the polish designer uses flowers, leaves and plants to convey his beliefs about value, beauty and the ephemeral, while beautifully highlighting their processes of decay. Although this process of temporal crystallization may appear to follow an aesthetic path, it is actually a lamentation over the inherent movement of life and nature, the elements of which continue to slowly decay over time, we providing information on the passage of time and the importance of its mutation. The resulting pieces include various decorative objects, ranging from intricate metal sculptures to elegant floral vases in resin or shellac.

marcin rusak uses flowers to crystallize discoloration at slovenian biennial of design BIO27

the DNA of things

The exhibition captures Rusak’s most recent research, bringing together the most essential element of any living organism, DNA, with the application of new experimental technologies. This, in turn, creates a hybrid relationship with the natural world that serves as a “memory keeper” due to the ability to store an encrypted message internally like a time capsule. It is a conversation between humans and plant beings that attempts to communicate with the future and divert the course of our own life cycles from the axis of time.

“We primarily perceive a DNA molecule as a part of life unrelated to the computer world. However, for several billion years, DNA has been used by organisms to store biological information in their genomes. And this information may, in fact, be linked to any other type of data, including digital files. the creator shares. “DNA, under favorable conditions (protected from light, water and high temperatures) can last for thousands of years (unlike hard drives which, as we all know, can last for many shorter time). On the other hand, the lifespan of plants is finite. (…) The implementation of DNA could possibly lead to an unexpected result for the carrier plant as well as for the surrounding ecosystem. The final inevitable question is ethics – should we use living organisms for our data storage needs? Rusak asks.

marcin rusak uses flowers to crystallize discoloration at slovenian biennial of design BIO27

About BIO27

The Slovenian design biennial BIO, the oldest in the world, is one of the most important international design events in Europe. First organized in 1963, it has been hosted by the Museum of Architecture and Design in Ljubljana since 1972. Its mission is to seek innovative development-friendly intersections between architecture and the industrial and academic sectors.

The 27th edition is organized by Jane Withers and Ria Hawthorn. Titled “Super Vernaculars,” it explores a growing and ambitious movement that draws on vernacular intelligence and indigenous architecture and design traditions to inform innovative responses to the social and environmental challenges of the 21st century. BIO27 is organized by two institutions based in Ljubljana: MAO – Museum of Architecture and Design and the Center for Creativity

marcin rusak uses flowers to crystallize discoloration at slovenian biennial of design BIO27

Marcin Rusak uses flowers to crystallize deterioration at the Slovenian Design Biennial BIO27

Marcin Rusak uses flowers to crystallize deterioration at the Slovenian Design Biennial BIO27

image © designboom Marcin Rusak uses flowers to crystallize deterioration at the Slovenian Design Biennial BIO27
image © designboom

Marcin Rusak uses flowers to crystallize deterioration at the Slovenian Design Biennial BIO27

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